The Evidential Problem of Food

Assessing evidence in nutrition often requires filling in gaps. Conversely, gaps in the evidence are often exploited, and the role of nutrition overstated as a result. Could a nutrition-specific framework for evaluating evidence overcome these issues?

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The Evidential Problem of Food

Assessing evidence in nutrition often requires filling in gaps. Conversely, gaps in the evidence are often exploited, and the role of nutrition overstated as a result. Could a nutrition-specific framework for evaluating evidence overcome these issues?

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‘Methodolatry’, RCTs, and the Limits of Reductionism: Part 2

Incorrect assumptions about causation, together with methodological prejudice, have generated a number of issues for nutrition science, and a dismissal of the processes through which we arrive at conclusions based on the evidence. Both of these issues will be discussed in this second part of this article.

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‘Methodolatry’, RCTs, and the Limits of Reductionism: Part 2

Incorrect assumptions about causation, together with methodological prejudice, have generated a number of issues for nutrition science, and a dismissal of the processes through which we arrive at conclusions based on the evidence. Both of these issues will be discussed in this second part of this article.

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‘Methodolatry’, RCTs, and the Limits of Reductionism: Part 1

What is the purpose of any scientific inquiry? A common-case answer, regardless of discipline, would be: to bring us closer to a ‘truth’, understanding truth is approximate, and use that information to inform practice. In many of the conversations around evidence in nutrition, and how it is applied, the RCT has taken on a bizarre double-agent role.

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‘Methodolatry’, RCTs, and the Limits of Reductionism: Part 1

What is the purpose of any scientific inquiry? A common-case answer, regardless of discipline, would be: to bring us closer to a ‘truth’, understanding truth is approximate, and use that information to inform practice. In many of the conversations around evidence in nutrition, and how it is applied, the RCT has taken on a bizarre double-agent role.

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Science is Transparent

Science is transparent. This transparency is fundamental to the integrity of the scientific method. Consider the process: a theory is proposed, and the proposers make predictions about their hypothesis, which are then tested in a study. The findings of that research are then subject to review by peers in the field.

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Science is Transparent

Science is transparent. This transparency is fundamental to the integrity of the scientific method. Consider the process: a theory is proposed, and the proposers make predictions about their hypothesis, which are then tested in a study. The findings of that research are then subject to review by peers in the field.

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Science-based nutrition, communicated effectively.

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